Prince of Storms review: “One of the most captivating multi-cultural settings in SF history.” –SF Site

Wow, a stellar review of Prince of Storms from SF Site. I know that I don’t get to believe all this (since I don’t believe my bad reviews!) but here goes:

From the SF Site review:

. . . . Titus’ desire, and need to save, protect, reconcile with, and love the women in his life, and the tragedy of his too often failures to do so, pervades the decisions Titus makes throughout the series. Those relationships also guarantee that no matter how grand the scheme of Kay Kenyon’s creation becomes, the story remains grounded in human concerns. The fate of two universes may be at stake, but the true tragedy lies in the fate of the people, human and otherwise, who live there.

When Bright of the Sky, the first novel in The Entire and the Rose appeared, comparisons were quickly made between Kenyon’s Bright, Larry Niven’s Ringworld, and Philip José Farmer’s Riverworld. With the publication of Prince of Storms, it’s just as easy to make comparisons to C.J. Cherryh’s many novels dealing with the relationships of power in society, and to Frank Herbert’s examination in Dune of the dangers inherent in trying to control the future. That’s pretty rarified company, and in the case of The Entire and the Rose completely deserved. With The Entire and the Rose, Kay Kenyon has crafted one of the most captivating multi-universe, multi-cultural settings in science fiction history, and used it tell a story of tragedy and loss, of decisions made and regretted, sacrifices made, and an ultimate re-birth and renewal. It’s a grand theme that more than matches its brilliant setting, and that makes The Entire and the Rose a landmark science fiction series of the twenty-first century, one that deserves a place on the bookshelf of science fiction readers everywhere.

–Greg L. Johnson, SF Site

2 Responses

  1. Hi Kay,

    Believe it.

    Greg J

  2. Kay says:

    Well, oh all right!
    (I’m easy)

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