The next fiction dream

Dear readers and friends,

My blog is changing. I’ll be sharing more personal perspectives on the writing life rather than teaching fiction. I find that I need to commit more time to my writing, and some things, alas, must go.  It’s exciting to have a new book coming out, and of course, the next one’s under way. They’ll now get more of my attention.  I hope you’ll still drop by and catch some of my musings on the writing life and, soon, some insights into my latest book.  With many thanks–Kay

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As I write this, I’m embarking on a new novel. As usual with any new book I work on, I don’t talk about my concept. Talking about the book too soon seems to cool the fire I need to get started on the venture–to believe the story is possible, to commit my energy to the next fictive dream.

But I still want to talk about my writing experience. The wins, losses, hopes, frustrations, and those occasional spectacular gifts from the writing gods.

Today my observations on this insane process of novel writing relates to how incredibly high story hopes climb at the beginning. I’ve seen it many times with my books, and sometimes with short stories, that at first there is a kind of love affair with a story.

Serial book love

Why does the next story always seem like the most exciting project ever? The finished books are all very well, but one has, after all, written, and rewritten, and read them ad nauseum, down to the final galleys. So they fade in the heart, a little. Oh, but the WIP! And that goes for my latest WIP. I just love this new story. At least the potential of it.

After so long in the business, I’m schooled enough to be humble, but in the back of my mind, I’m saying this one is dazzling.

Or is it? Maybe I’m getting better in some ways with each book I write.  And it’s at least possible that I have a tiger by the tail with the latest  one. But it might just as easily be an infatuation with something new.

Maybe it’s serial book love. An excitement untainted by the practical matter of getting that brilliant story down on the cold, white page. There will be battles and doubts ahead. The new love will no doubt prove to have feet of clay. . . and I may love it just a little less, eventually. But, no matter. We take what the writing gods offer.

Today I’m in love.

7 Responses

  1. I think this is normal and healthy. After all, why bother writing a story that’s LESS exciting, entrancing, exhilarating than something you’ve done before?

  2. Thaswoomodius the Grim says:

    Less blog….more book…gooooood.

    Although I am always happily surprised when I get your email, I was beginning to think you were really a pen name for George R.R.

    But then again, it is very easy for the unpublished to bring down the hammer on the published for their next book.

    So I will wait in great antici……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
    pation for A Thousand Perfect Things (although I will happily accept 500 Perfect Things if it will speed things up).

  3. Kay says:

    Oh, ouch! But really, that was very funny. 500 Perfect Things. I am chastized. I am laughing.

  4. Irene Gallant says:

    I enjoy(ed) receiving your emails. I, too, am working on a novel and need to adjust my schedule to accommodate the completion. I have several in the works and decided one of them needs to be completed this year.

    Looking forward to reading “A Thousand Perfect Things”.

    All the best,

    Irene

  5. Jay Noel says:

    Good for you, Kay.

    Reading your teaching blog is definitely one of the reasons for my getting two publishing contracts for my own work, so thank you.

    I’m reading Seeds of Time, by the way.

  6. Kay says:

    Jay -Well, that is high praise. Glad to think I have been helpful!
    And as for The Seeds of Time – that reaches way back there.Let me know when you finish and I’ll tell you a fun tale about selling that book.

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