Archive for the ‘Publishing Industry’ Category

Two fiction classes comin’ up

I’m giving two live online workshops this fall! I’ve found that webinars are fun and can get us re-engaged with our writing. (To hear about all my online teaching–and other cool stuff–you can join my newsletter.)

 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST WRITERS CONFERENCE

Six Slippery Sins: Good advice that goes astray

Often what we think we know just isn’t true. “Common knowledge” about fiction can deaden our stories, including time-honored advice like start fast and get to the point in dialogue. We’ll take a fresh look at “vivid” descriptions, and how “showing” sadness can end up distancing a reader by “telling.” For writers at all levels, this class examines the deeper truths suggested by, or obscured by, fiction maxims.

Saturday, September 26 (Time to be announced.)

Click HERE to register for the PNWA Conference, one day or several.

(More class details to be posted soon on the PNWA website.)

 

WRITE ON THE SOUND CONFERENCE

Move Along, Folks: Pacing the novel

One agent who gets 10,000 pitches a month says that 95% of rejected manuscripts are paced too slowly. We can fix this! This pacing workshop is for beginning and intermediate-level novelists and exposes classic pacing mistakes, large and small. We’ll identify the dramatic underpinnings that give horsepower to a story’s unfolding and their use in structure and scene. We’ll also come away with on-the-page tools that can keep the wind in your story’s sails.

Saturday, October 3, 4:15 – 3:30

Click HERE to register for the Write on the Sound Conference, one day or several.

Pitching your novel

How do you pitch a novel? And why lavish time on it? Is it just so that we won’t be caught flat-footed when someone asks what the story is about?

The Point of Pitching

While it’s true that an intriguing, quick blurb for a novel makes us look more professional–and saves us the embarrassment of stumbling through a confused rendition, a pitch also has a deep marketing purpose.

A  pitch positions your novel amid the world of books. It gives instant perspective on the story, pinpointing genre, tone, and unique features. Publishing today depends on branding and brevity. For better or worse, we’re in the world of entertainment and marketing with its thirst for audience definition. Read More…

Writing a novel synopsis

The two-page synopsis is one of the toughest things I have to write. Yes, even harder than the chapter outline.

I mean, if I have 20 or so pages to convey my story in a detailed way, it’s kind of like writing a short story. The old line “Sorry this response is so long, but I didn’t have time to make it short,” carries a hidden truth. In many cases, long is easier than brief.

So, yes, I do think the two-page synopsis is murder. I like to start long and gradually pare down. (There are people who can pound out a synopsis in one sitting, but these people can never be my friends.) Read More…

Pitching a Novel

How do you pitch a novel? And why lavish time on it? Is it just so that we won’t be caught flat-footed when someone asks what the story is about?

The Point of Pitching

A pitch is more than a conversational gambit. It’s true that an intriguing, quick blurb for a novel makes us look more professional–and saves us the embarrassment of stumbling through a painful and confused rendition. But a pitch also has a deep marketing purpose that goes beyond elevator encounters with editors.

A pitch for your novel positions your story amid the world of books. In that larger context, it gives instant perspective on the story, pinpointing genre, tone, and unique features. Read More…

Landscapes of Fantasy

For those who attended my presentation at PNWA, here is the book list I promised:

LANDSCAPES OF FANTASY. A presentation by Kay Kenyon

The Books

Mythic

  • The Buried Giant, Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Last Unicorn, Peter Beagle
  • American Gods, Neil Gaiman

Fairy

  • A Green and Ancient Light, Frederic Durbin
  • Roses and Rot, Kat Howard
  • Thomas the Rhymer, Ellen Kushner

Read More…