Archive for the ‘Publishing Industry’ Category

Worldbuilding with Sharon Shinn

sharon-shinn-color-pic This is the next to last guest post for the Ways into Worldbuilding series. I am especially pleased this week to welcome a true master of fantasy, Sharon Shinn.

Sharon Shinn has published 26 novels, one collection, and assorted pieces of short fiction since her first book came out in 1995. Among her books are the Twelve Houses series (Mystic and Rider and its sequels), the Samaria series (Archangel and its sequels), the Shifting Circle series, and the Elemental Blessings series. She lives in St. Louis, loves the Cardinals, watches as many movies as she possibly can, and still mourns the cancellation of “Firefly.” Visit her website at or see her on Facebook at sharonshinnbooks.

Aside from reader expectations, why do you build worlds? Is it more of an obligation than a pleasure? If the latter, what is enjoyable or rewarding about this aspect? Read More…

World Fantasy Con: My schedule

Excited to be leaving for World Fantasy Convention on Thursday! The programming line-up looks especially interesting. After judging the World Fantasy Awards this year, I’m looking forward to the panels on differing types of fantasy and the diverse opportunities they give us as readers and writers.

My schedule:

FRIDAY

12:00 – Panel – UNION AB

Trilogies? Small Stuff! The challenges and triumphs of writing a long, multi-volume series. What should someone starting a long series know at the outset? Lee Modesitt, David Drake, David Coe (m), Sharon Shinn, Mercedes Lackey and me.

SATURDAY

2:30 – Reading – UNION C

I’ll read from my upcoming release from Saga Press: At the Table of Wolves, book 1 of a paranormal espionage series set in the thirties in England and Europe.

SUNDAY

3:30 – Judges panel – UNION AB

Check out the full programming here.

Some of the authors who’ll be there:

Port Townsend Photographer

Louise Marley

Lee-pic3B (1)

Lee Modesitt

FullSizeRender 4

Sharon Shinn

C.S.E. Cooney

C.S.E. Cooney

Worldbuilding with Django Wexler

Guest posts for the Ways into Worldbuilding series will appear on two more Wednesdays. This latest interview is Version 2from fantasy author Django Wexler.

Django Wexler graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh with degrees in creative writing and computer science, and worked for the university in artificial intelligence research.  Eventually he migrated to Microsoft in Seattle, where he now lives with two cats and a teetering mountain of books.  When not writing, he wrangles computers, paints tiny soldiers, and plays games of all sorts.

Aside from reader expectations, why do you build worlds? Is it more of an obligation than a pleasure? If the latter, what is enjoyable or rewarding about this aspect?

For me, worldbuilding is a pleasure, indeed sometimes a guilty pleasure.  I often end up worldbuilding way more than finally makes it into the book, and have to reluctantly prune out paragraphs of exposition that illuminate world details but serve no story purpose. Read More…

Worldbuilding with Louise Marley

Port Townsend PhotographerGuest posts for the Ways into Worldbuilding series will appear most Wednesdays through early November. This week’s guest is the award-winning author Louise Marley.

Louise Marley is a former concert and opera singer, and the author of 18 novels of fantasy, science fiction, and historical fiction.  A graduate of Clarion West ’93, she has twice won the Endeavour Award for excellence in science fiction, and has been shortlisted for the Campbell, the Nebula, and the Tiptree Awards.  Her historical fiction, the Benedict Hall trilogy, is written under the pseudonym Cate Campbell.  She lives on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State with her husband Jake and a rowdy Border Terrier named Oscar.

Aside from reader expectations, why do you build worlds? Is it more of an obligation than a pleasure? If the latter, what is enjoyable or rewarding about this aspect?

Since my inspiration is often visual, an image that comes to my mind, I love worldbuilding.  When I read, I expect to go someplace beyond the mundane world we live in, and when I write, I very much want to do the same.  I yearn for different scenery, different cultures, different societies, and a touch of the fantastic become real. Read More…