Drawing Winners

Categories: News |

Thank you to my newsletters subscribers who entered to win my latest drawing!

I am pleased to send to the following winners a paperback copy of Dystopia, my science fiction short story collection: Craig. J., Ana I. and Sanjuanita M.

Craig, Ana and Sanjuanita, your book will be on the way soon. Congratulations!

The prize for the drawing, my first short story colleciton.

And just to mention: My recently published second story collection!

 

My SF novel at $.99

Categories: News |

Grab it while it’s under a dollar — The Seeds of Time

NOW through Sunday, October 13

 

Clio Finn is a time travel pilot on the run from a dystopian and graying Earth. Now she’s found a planet with what could be viable, saving biota. If she can get home from across the galaxy. With the enemies Clio’s got, that’s a very big IF. One week only, the eBook is reduced to $.99 at all e-retailers.

The Seeds of Time, a reader favorite.

Click here to purchase: books2read.com/seeds

Is This Scene Worth It?

Don’t let tepid scenes suck the juice from your novel.

One simple step can save you time — and perhaps your novel.

Recognize this situation? You’ve just re-read the last scene written, and now it’s time to write another. You have a sort-of-good idea for it. And maybe when you write it, it will improve “in the telling.”

On the other hand, you’re thinking, you could just explain the action in a narrative bridge. Or perhaps tuck the information bit by bit into several scenes? In other words, you’re not sure the scene is worth it.

So how can we decide whether to bring this nugget of action on stage in a scene?

“Forward the plot” is the usual scene advice. But even following that criteria it’s  easy to write tepid, low-interest scenes.

Let your intuition help.

Here’s a quick way to help you judge if your idea for the scene is good enough: Give it a title. (You won’t use these titles in the manuscript, this is just a quick test for drama.)

The title doesn’t need to be catchy or meaningful to anyone else. But to you, it reflects the dramatic essence of the next story bit. Examples from my planning notebook for a recent novel:

Blood on the silver screen Read More…

Crossing that chasm in your novel

Sometimes we writers (you know who you are) hit a blind spot in the novel. Not really a bout of writer’s block, but a serious question about What Comes Next.

We might nobly feel like writing but we can’t quite picture the next sequence. Even when we have confidence in the overall plot, sometimes a section is like looking across a chasm where the bridge is down.

All the light goes out of the room, and we may find ourselves sullen and resentful. This is not what we signed up for. Writing flows, it doesn’t require construction work, for crying out loud. We begin to think: My planning didn’t work, my plot is too thin. I am one of those writers whose time is, sadly, up. My novel hates me.

As we get a grip on this hissy fit, we eventually conclude that it’s time to do some deep, methodical plotting. We’re going to have to think through this sequence of the story in excruciating detail.

And truthfully, we’d rather put pins in our cheeks.  Read More…

Of aliens and butterflies

Categories: News |

My new short story collection

I’m so pleased to announce a new collection of science fiction short stories. Most were published in anthologies over the years and are gathered together here for the first time.

In these stories, you can walk the decks of a generation ship, meet gentle and not-so-gentle alien life, ride on the shoulders of an avatar, and enter a new green world where metal bows down to the seeds of time. Available in ebook and paper.

For another of my short story collections, try Dystopia: Seven Dark and Hopeful Tales!